Tag Archives: art how to

10 More Great Tips for Artists

10 More Great Tips For Artists – 2
©Cricket Diane C Phillips, 2008

1. Go through the house, office and studio – sharpen every pencil – make sure anywhere with a writing surface has a cup of pencils, pens and an old-fashioned hand held kid’s pencil sharpener. Place some sheets of clean, un-lined paper nearby, plus posty notes and 4×6 sheets of unlined paper to make thumbnails and notes.

2. When paint tubes are near their end, cut them open and use the last of the paint directly from the casing or scape out with palette knife and use from the palette. Save the lid, cause sooner or later . . .

3. Place paint cloths, paper towels and cloths filled with thinners or turpentine into old metal coffee cans with lids. Keep out of reach of children and away from foodstuff until ready for disposal. Be sure and mark can with red electrical or paint tape and label with marker what it is.

4. A piece of rubberized, textured shelf liner cut 4″ square is good for opening paints, paint jars and tubes, jars of medium and varnishes. Pliers, if used, must be held firm but with gentleness or they can rip the paint tube and press the lid and tube lip beyond recognition.

5. Baby wipes will take almost any paint off hands including oil paints, acrylics, alkyds (which are very nasty) and acrylic mediums – as well as some glues. Masking fluid can be cleaned up with dawn dish soap and a baby wipe. Brushes dipped in dawn dish soap and water before use in masking fluids will allow the masking fluid to be removed after use.

6. Dawn dish soap will take oil paints and other paints, except alkyds, off hands and out of brushes. Xylene and toluene based enamels must have their own thinners to be removed from anything. Do not use dawn dish soap or toluene based thinners on natural bristle brushes because the natural oils in the hairs are also removed and the bristles will eventually disintegrate. Do not leave brushes in water, turpentine or thinners for any extended length of time. Glues that hold bristles can dissolve and are compromised. The bristles will then release in the painted surface as it is being created. The bristles can also give way entirely from the metal casing that holds them to the handle..

7. Old brushes with dried paint make perfect tools to create certain special effects in painting surfaces. Don’t yell at the kids and don’t throw them out. Set them aside in a cup or box with similar tools for special effects when painting and sculpting.

8. When stores go out of business – there is a lot of unusual shelving they also sell – make them an offer. Also, hair salons’ shelving and store displays make good additions for studio  storage. Cabinets from kitchen remodeling can be acquired and cleaned, resurfaced, painted or glued with new formica pieces. Countertops can be added pre-made from the hardware store or from cabinet shop remakes. Any solid door or old table top can be placed on top of several cabinets for a worktable.

9. Some design markers (professional grade like ad agencies and illustrators use) can be reconstituted by placing alcohol or acetone (nail polish remover) into a shallow dish and placing the tip into it to absorb the carrier. Some art markers can be reconstituted with water, alcohol (or mineral spirits and/or painting mediums). Use of pigments are available in a new form with the latter and are no longer appropriate for children to use.

10. As new work is being created or experimental ideas are being explored, take digital photos or scans throughout the process at different stages. Viewing them on the computer gives a better view and a different understanding of what is being conveyed in the paint. Then, the process can continue with the additional information during the creation of the work.

Happy Painting!

(Re-post from 2008)

 

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Artist Tips and Tricks – repost

Tips and Tricks for Artists –
© Cricket Diane C. Phillips, 2008

Ten art tips and tricks for artists-

* place a sign on the bathroom mirror that says, “Paint first – Do music – Create. And leave the mundane to do later, it can wait.”

* the best palettes for oils and acrylics are glass, old pyrex casserole dishes, thick glass cutting boards – smooth side only, microwave browning plates for watercolors and thick plate glass can be used for oils or acrylics and gouache.

* a wonderful brush cleaner can be made by cutting a circle from rubberized open-weave shelf liner in the same size as the bottom of a washed applesauce cup, small bottle or container.

* using a wet paper towel folded over beneath acrylic paints will keep them ready to use for several weeks with plastic wrap covering the palette. Edges of wrap need to be snug.

* point guards for brushes, bamboos, calligraphy pens, styluses, djanti and specialty tools can be made with small pieces of cardboard or plastic boxes cut to fit from a fold and taped together.

* strong tea makes a sepia toned dye for paper and made strong enough, can serve as a watercolor paint to do under-painting work or as the basic wash and paint for a vintage look artwork.

* one way to organize thumbnails and small composition sketches is to cut them into the size for a 4×6 photo album. Also, it’s possible to use the inner papers from these albums for thumbnails and then store them in the albums by subject to locate later.

* most vegetable based and India inks are not waterproof. Many fixative sprays made for pastels, watercolors and pencil drawings will set the surface and allow the ink to become permanent.

* when fixative sprays, spray finishes and glazes, spray varnishes and any other aerosol product gets near the end of the can, any type of artwork can be destroyed by the spitting drops of spray. This can also happen during very cold or very moist, humid weather.

* horizon lines, building edges and other straight-edged elements can be created with pieces of painters’ tape for a smooth, straight line. Make sure the tape is pushed into the surface to paint at the edge where paint will be.

Check back. More tips and tricks for artists are coming soon including easel ideas and designs. Take a look at my Ebay store sometime, I’d love for you to see my work!

Mixing Artist Paints into Designer Colors How To

[Reposted from CricketDiane blog 2008]

On Paints and Color – Tips for Artists –  2008

Written by Cricket Diane C Phillips, Cricket House Studios, 2008

Artist paints in the tube are not the current fashion colors. While some very rich, jewel tones can be achieved by using artist colors straight out of the tube, today’s color trend hues are mixed, either on the palette or on the painting as it is painted.

In order to get these tones of color, use a color chart from any paint or discount store used for wall and house paints, *(interior and exterior paint color swatches.) Using these as a guideline, mix to match.

Series colors are simple additions of white or grey within the same range. Almost all fashion colors are mixtures and blends of artist’s hues in combination. Compare to swatches and if necessary, write down the ingredients and ratios used to create them on palette cards. Be sure to dot color on palette cards and remember – fully dry is a slightly different variation of the wet color. In use, it may have to be changed to read correctly.

Complementary colors and secondary color groups can be created in either the same range of hue and tone, or for visual tension and contrast, can be dissonant to one another; for example, bright red and soft, pastel turquoise. These dissonant combinations will either brighten or grey each color when used together or near one another. They can bring objects closer to the viewer, make things appear to stand out in the composition or appear distant and muddied.

True complements used in strength, flatten the picture plane which when juxtaposed with elements of technical perspective to create illusions of depth and volume in a flat surface. Look at the work of Chagall and Gaugin for comparison.

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I’m adding this today to go with mixing designer colors from artist paint tube color –

Many home improvement stores including Lowe’s, Home Depot, Ace Hardware and paint stores for home decor and home exterior paints have small quantities of mixed designer colors in acrylic liquid paint.

These are suitable either for making art paintings directly with them or to use in mixing artist tube paints into their matching and complementary color palettes for artworks using artist’s paints.

Usually these small quantities of designer colors are found in the paint departments, are acrylic paint basically and the quantities are about $3 – $4 each. It is possible to design a range of colors to match cohesively and attractively with them by having these small jars to use for creating the matching palette.

There are of course, paint swatches also available but they can be misleading by themselves, since the range an artwork must provide needs to have a minimum of, a full palette in the dominant and secondary hue ranges to accomplish the artist’s visual tasks.

Magazine pictures and photographs of where the artwork will eventually be displayed are also misleading and it must be kept in mind that lighting alters the tones and character of paints, both in designer colors and artistic colors no matter how they are mixed.

Photography of a room’s decor can seem to be one set of hues, when in real life under natural and on site lighting, as well as the position where the artwork will be displayed, will host a much distant reality for the work.

Designer colors change and what looks right online is far different than what any of the colors would actually be, as well. Taking these things into account in the studio as the palette of colors are created, it is possible to either ignore all of it and simply create.

Or, to create using a palette that can most reasonably accommodate these difference in lighting, staging, photography, online presentations of the work both individually and in the rooms where it will be displayed as well as in matching the designer color palette used within the environment where the artwork and artist’s reputation will live.

Also, a last note – keep in mind that often in magazine publication practices and in many advertising applications, online applications and printed artworks, the color range is altered using the color levels function of various software apps. The end ranges are removed to the point on the levels charts where color graphs indicate positions of strongest color to enhance the visual impact of the photograph, ad or artwork.

Since that changes the color true visual facts, do not assume that an artwork’s color palette and paints as seen in person will match a designer or decorator themed room as seen in photographs from a magazine or online feature article.

Even if a tablecloth seems to be a certain range of color, chances are that the levels function was used to visually enhance the colors for publication and in person, artwork made to work cohesively with it will appear washed out or occasionally, completely at odds with the design colors.

For more tips and tools about making art, painting, design, creativity and making – check back with my blog. I will be adding more information from my older blog at CricketDiane as well as creating new articles and blog posts for this one.

  • cricketdiane 12-29-2016

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