88 Ways to Say No to Trump with Anti-Trump Political Meme Button Pins

88 Ways to Say No to Trump –

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And some bumper stickers –

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And Anti-Trump Hats –

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And a great anti-Trump tote bag –

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And these –

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Advertisements

3 Designs for Mom

Three designs I’ve made today for Mother’s Day gifts –

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Added one more that I just made a few minutes ago. I really like it best of all. This, I love you mom coffee mug reminds me of all the notes I’ve been given from my children, grandchildren now and many friends kids over the years after we worked on arts and crafts together. (well, except that they put Cricket on it rather than Mom.) I have a warm feeling every time I see those notes and this mug does that to me too. Very nice feeling.

 

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Places to Sell Online

Sell on Amazon

This page on Amazon lists categories in which a seller can sell various things on Amazon without any special permission, including about 20 different categories of products. It also lists the requirements on those categories which do have special requirements for selling them on Amazon.

Approval is not required to sell these products. Sellers may be required to meet special requirements in order to list some products. Both Individual and Professional Sellers can offer products in these categories, except where noted.

https://services.amazon.com/services/soa-approval-category.htm/ref=asus_soa_snav_cat

However, there seems to be about a $40 a month fee plus other selling fees for selling on Amazon in this way. Haven’t checked all of that yet, but it certainly reaches a vast audience of potential customers.

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Also on Amazon – there are two categories of note to artists and crafters who create handmade products. One of these categories is listed as this, but only available for collectibles and with approval from Amazon for Professional Sellers only. It is about halfway down the list.

Paintings, Drawings, Mixed Media (Two-Dimensional), Limited Edition Prints and Photographs

https://services.amazon.com/services/soa-approval-category.htm/ref=asus_soa_snav_cat

Then there is another category called –

Handmade and Hand-altered Products

which takes a jump over to this page for the requirements –

https://services.amazon.com/handmade/handmade.html/ref=asus_soa_cat_hnd

To be approved, all of your products must meet our definition of handmade, listed below in our FAQ. Applications are reviewed by our team within 48 hours.

In the video on this page, it says there is not a monthly fee for having handmade items on this site, but I didn’t find where the fees are when items sell, yet.

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Society6

https://help.society6.com/hc/en-us/articles/227119388

Below you will find the required resolutions for our alternative products. To achieve these exact dimensions you may need to crop your original high-resolution file. However, do not increase the size by resampling in a photo edition program, as this will distort the quality of your work.

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Printify: 200+ Print on Demand products

https://apps.shopify.com/printify

  • Catalog of 200+ unique products. Use our HQ Mockup Generator to create custom printed products with your design.
  • Print Provider Network. Access all the best Print Providers in one place – select by price, location and more.
  • Print on Demand Drop Shipping. We manage automated order printing and shipping directly to your customers – with your branding.

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THE MOST POPULAR PRINT ON DEMAND SHOPIFY APPS REVIEWED

Feb 22, 2017

http://www.justincener.com/the-most-popular-print-on-demand-shopify-apps-reviewed/

GearLaunch  easily wins the competition for best print on demand partner for Shopify. Best service, quality, consistent fast delivery… no one comes close to GearLaunch. Check out the video as I walk through the installation method to make the integration. Don’t worry, it’s super easy and no technical skill is required whatsoever.

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The Best Shopify T-Shirt Fulfillment Apps in 2017

September 2017

https://www.logicinbound.com/the-best-shopify-t-shirt-fulfillment-apps-in-2017/

For the most part, Shopify T-shirt fulfillment apps all work the same way, with minor nuances and variations.

After integrating the app and building out some designs, your POD app will sync the designs to your store. When a customer purchases a t-shirt, the order is sent directly to your POD supplier where they print and ship the shirt to your customer.

This all happens automatically behind the scenes without any manual order processing. This allows you to focus on higher value responsibilities like marketing your store to increase traffic, improving conversion rate, increasing average order size, and raising customer lifetime value.

also –

Teelaunch –

Teelaunch has more competitive margins, so you make more money on each sale. This allows you to spend more on marketing, and invest more back into your business to grow faster.

Here is a quick breakdown of margins across a few of Teelaunch’s products:

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Printful + Shopify

Lists the things they offer for print on demand with your designs and they are shipped out of several locations in the US and Europe to arrive to the customers faster (within 3 days mostly.)

https://apps.shopify.com/printful

  1. White label service: We don’t include any Printful branding when we ship your orders. You’re the star of the show, and we make sure your brand is front and centre with our branding tools, like a free sticker of your logo on every order.

  2. Discounted samples: Order samples of your products for 20% off and free shipping worldwide! See exactly what your customers are getting.

    Your end price will depend on what you and your customers think is fair, but we recommend a minimum profit margin of 30%.

    Say you’re selling a Gildan 64000 unisex softstyle t-shirt. Your price is $18.00. Our price is $8.95. Subtract our price from yours and you get a profit of $9.05.

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Redbubble

https://www.redbubble.com/

Redbubble was born in 2006 in Melbourne, Australia. The dream was simple. Give independent artists a meaningful new way to sell their creations. Today, we connect over 400k artists and designers across the planet with millions of passionate fans. A brave (and dare we say stylish) new world of self expression.

(and)

Creative? Like money? Open a shop in minutes. For free. Just upload your art and designs and leave the rest to us. We handle all the printing (on over 60 quality products) and shipping to almost anywhere on earth. Ready? Let’s go.

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Also – Very Helpful Stuff –

https://www.visme.co/videos/visual-design-principles/

https://www.gcflearnfree.org/excel2013/

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Shopify

https://www.shopify.com/free-trial?term=%2Bshopify&Network=Search&SiteTarget=&mt=b&adid=213707809836&adpos=1t2&CampaignId=788843257&branded_enterprise=1&BOID=brand&gclid=Cj0KCQjw1-fVBRC3ARIsAIifYOMCO0oIuDV8JWCiozvlqWAXjva3g0upleDUNcJCRpP99Lj4gUQWCOcaAn-5EALw_wcB

Pricing as low as $9/month

Whether you sell online, on social media, in store, or out of the trunk of your car, Shopify has you covered. Start selling anywhere for just $9/month.

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About CricketDiane –

I’ve been creating nearly every day since I was a kid and that is over 50 years. I’ve created in numerous ways in a range that moves from art to problem-solving to inventing, creating music, sculpting and painting to writing and doing various computer / online based projects.

You can find more of my art and designs here –

CricketDiane and Cricket House Studios Store on Zazze

and other blog writings by me here –

https://cricketdiane.wordpress.com/

And see my current efforts on GoFundMe to make a board game I created into a video game that I’m working on right now –

The Scared Donkey Mine Money Game by CricketDiane on GoFundMe

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One of the products I’ve made on Zazzle –

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Wine Tasting Invitations with Wine Vino and Grapes Designs Aprons Tote Bags Posters Art

These designer wine items I made recently on my Zazzle store from artworks that were both hand rendered as drawings and photographs I made – then some of the designs also worked from there through Photoshop to make nifty new looks for them.

The designs on this post are for wine tasting events, for wine lovers and to have wine themed artwork in your home or apartment, or vacation cottage. They make great wine themed gifts too.

The first design is in black and white with the word, Vino on it – as an artwork poster showing the wine bottle and grapes from one of my hand-rendered drawings.

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These two shopping tote bags are pretty and fashionably trendy with the same wine bottle and grapes drawing I did and the word, Vino across it.

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There is also a vino / wine apron I made from the wine bottle and grapes drawing to use hosting a wine tasting event or barbecue / cookout. Or – as a gift to someone who loves cooking with wine.

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Wine Tasting invitations made with a CricketDiane artwork and design – with a bottle of vino and simple clean drawing of a wine bottle and grapes plus information you can customize to your wine event or wine tasting party.

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One of the other still life wine bottle, wine glass and copper kettle with grapes photographs that I made with a different artistic look to the image (as a poster). Great poster for the kitchen, dining room, for a boutique coffee house or for a wine seller to gift at a tasting event.

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Showing the wine bottle design I did in a drawing for this vino tote – I love the look of the grapes in this one. It is a great wine tote bag to take to a wine tasting or a weekend at the vineyard tasting events.

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A nice poster art piece using one of my photographs of a still life with wine bottle, wine glass, grapes and a copper tea kettle. Using art software, I changed the colors and added the word, Vino to the image. Available on demand at Zazzle through my CricketDiane store.

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A nice tote bag to take with you to that wine tasting event and bring back at least a couple bottles of vino. One of my pastel chalk drawings of a wine bottle, wine glass and grapes made the design for this contemporary fashion vino tote.

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About CricketDiane –

I’ve been creating nearly every day since I was a kid and that is over 50 years. I’ve created in numerous ways in a range that moves from art to problem-solving to inventing, creating music, sculpting and painting to writing and doing various computer / online based projects.

“It is better to make the effort to move forward and release the flow of ideas to work with them and do things creatively, create things and invent and write and make – I definitely know that by experience.” – cricketdiane, 2018

 

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You can find more of my art and designs here –

CricketDiane and Cricket House Studios Store on Zazzle

 

and other blog writings by me here –

https://cricketdiane.wordpress.com/

https://cricketdiane.com/

On YouTube –

CricketDiane Phillips

 

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The website for Cricket House Studios Art and Design is found here –

http://www.crickethousestudios.com/

And see my current efforts on GoFundMe to make a board game I created into a video game that I’m working on right now –

The Scared Donkey Mine Money Game by CricketDiane on GoFundMe

 

Thanks for checking us out!

The Cricket House Studios Team and CricketDiane

 

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Avenue of Taking Your Art Into The Fine Art Galleries and Shows

There are many galleries that have original artworks for sale to their clients and the public. In every city, there are galleries with a variety of focused styles and themes along with those that have a varied selection.

In order to approach these galleries with artwork, you need to do a few simple things and it is possible that you could find one or more that would carry your original artworks.

 

CricketDiane 2018 Portfolio and Frames for Fine Artt DSC04514_cr
Portfolio and Frames for Fine Art

Aside from it being helpful to go to an art school or take your art education from a college or university art department program, it is also possible to attend classes and get instruction from a number of other sources and still be an appropriate match to fine art galleries.

Prepare Artwork for Galleries

First, you will need about 20 – 25 art pieces in the same style regardless of the medium used to create them. It helps to enter juried art shows and group fine art shows to add that information to the about your work sheet and bio.

That means, create a body of work such that you can create 20 or more pieces in the same style that is part of it with a theme that is easily recognizable and marketable in the fine art market. It also means to get into group shows with your work and especially, to enter juried shows with some of these pieces or artworks in this style and hopefully win some place ribbons or awards for them.

Write a Bio and About Your Work Page

If any collectors are collecting your work, if there are any prizes you’ve won in juried art shows, if you have been a part of invitation-only art shows – these will be great information to add to your list of credits about your work, as well and go a long way to encourage a fine art gallery to host your work.

Today, the bio and about your work sheet should reflect the most current information about your artwork, the shows where you’ve shown, professional associations where you are a member, collectors who’ve bought your work, ongoing professional development and classes you’ve taken. The artist’s bio and about your work information need to appear on your website, blog and online portfolios.

Photograph Your Work

It takes a lot of work to create the 20 – 25 pieces that form the portfolio elements that you will present to the galleries. These need to be in the same style, even if your body of work also includes other styles that you consider your own and like a lot.

The 20 – 25 pieces that you offer to fine art galleries must be photographed with as true to life colors as possible in as high a resolution as you can get – even 20mpx is available on some point and shoot cameras that are not inhibitively expensive.

Mount and Frame Artworks

Then, these pieces need to be mounted on foam core or bristol board with a neutral ph using archival tape and a framing mat over each one. Typically, these mats are the same color when used for this purpose – all white mats across the 25 pieces or all black.

Each piece of artwork is placed in a clear plastic sleeve that is purchased which is made for this purpose – for portfolios, for large pieces of artworks, or for packaging such as crystal clear packaging envelopes sold in nearly every size.

This set of artworks are placed in a portfolio case which are sold in various sizes and configurations including those for smaller works on paper that look like a very large black bound notebook sized to the artworks’ largest piece.

For watercolor papers that are 22″ x 30″, be sure to get a book or portfolio sized slightly larger and the same is true for the plastic sleeves to hold the work with its mount. An exact fit sized at 22″ x 30″ will not fit and have the extra 1/4″ depth that is taken up dimensionally by the mount and mat.

For canvas artworks, unless they are huge – over 4′ x 4′ or on canvases that are stretched across larger stretchers with the foldover edges painted as part of the work, they need to be framed. That is its own dilemna, since framing is as expensive as it is. Even artworks on paper that you have mounted as described, need to have framing and glass available for each one before the gallery will hang them when they say yes to you. It will be up to you to get that framing done for all of the pieces they accept.

Make an Online Portfolio

After writing the bio and about your work pages, building them into a website for your work, a contact page and portfolio online, get physical print copies of them to hand out with your work at shows, when approaching a gallery owner or curator, or to send by snail mail as needed. Make sure an keep updated copies of these handy in a google doc to grab quickly for emails to galleries and juried fine art shows, too.

The artist’s bio should read more like a quick endpaper description of an author that is commonly used on books, rather than a serious interpretation of why you are an artist. Part of what this bio should do, is be the kind of thing you would want said to others when the gallery owner tells them about who you are and how your work is special and so wonderful that they just need to see it right now.

Things to Include About Your Work

On the “about your work” page you write, it should include –

  • places your work has been shown
  • prizes you’ve won at juried shows
  • education in art and classes you’ve taken
  • professional associations you belong to in art
  • community organizations you belong to socially, such as Rotary, Lions’ Club, etc.
  • collectors and large collections who purchased your artworks
  • special uses of your artworks for newsletters, magazine covers or stories, posters
  • any purchase of your artworks / sculptures for the public – site specific installations, etc.
  • any special groups of artists to which you belong for group shows or studio space
  • classes you’ve given in art, sculpture, talks and podcasts

Note – remember to always put your name, contact info, email address, cellphone number and website address on every single page of every single paper that any show or gallery staff or art publisher might handle. These pages do end up separated and it will do no good to have a page of your brilliance being seen by someone if they can’t find out who belongs to it and how to get ahold of you easily when it matters.

Know the Galleries You Want to Approach

Once all these pieces are assembled, there are two other critical and important requirements you need to fulfill, both of which are fairly time-consuming – but they are, must-dos.

One must-do, is to check through information about the galleries that are available in the city where you live or the largest city near where you live, or the largest city in your state, as the case may be. And, to check through information about fine art galleries in your genre that are known to be selling those kinds of works frequently and successfully hosting gallery openings and shows dedicated to the kinds of work you do – more or less.

Two – or the second must-do, is to write down and memorize how you will bring an audience to these galleries which they otherwise do not enjoy or want access to getting and have every reason for wanting a way to attract those specific audiences of art buyers or potential art buyers.

Know What Gallery Pays For and What You Pay To Do

Galleries charge a percentage of every sale which can range from a low of 20% that is rare, to 60% for anyone whose work is completely unknown. Any gallery, agent or other avenue that charges to review your work for possible inclusion, is a sure sign that it is not a valid entry point into the marketing of your work to the fine art communities.

There are other costs too, that artists are commonly asked to cover, including the costs of hosting an opening night gala showing the works, posters or prints for the artist to sign that are part of the show of your work, promotional materials printing and mailing costs, and any other promotional costs of letting the public know about your work being at this gallery, (these usually extend beyond the show of your work, if the gallery continues carrying your works).

Aside from those costs, other promotional efforts for your work and the initial showing of your work are commonly yours to do. Many artists have found ways to get their artwork reviewed by Art in America and ArtForum or other fine art magazines.

Other Ways to Promote Your Work Must Be Used Too

Some artists have found ways to get a feature story about their work and its debut in a gallery or in the marketplace covered by these and other fine art publications.

Wikipedia has a list of them, found here – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_art_magazines which you can use to gather information about what is selling in the fine art markets, what is wanted as far as popular styles and themes, which galleries are having group shows where it may be possible to get an early entrance into the gallery’s show opportunities, and also to find many gallery addresses, info and contacts.

Regardless, promotion for your work today is almost totally yours to do and that includes sending press releases and doing other promotional types of work. It can be podcasts, write-ups in local papers or newsletters of community organizations and even those of art groups, hosting seminars or workshops, being on talk radio and tv shows – all of those things.

And, it is up to you to do things like sending postcards out to those who have bought your work or who have shown an interest in it, those who have supported your work with help or funding and those you want to interest in seeing your work to possibly buy it or support it.

Possibilities of Art Publishers / Limited Edition Prints

Fine art markets have art publishers specific to it which you can also pursue and that includes limited edition prints and illustrations, as well as other types of fine art publications. The costs of limited edition print runs can be difficult to cover unless an investor is found who will back part of the costs and you can show the popularity of your original fine art image you expect to be able to sell at a good price, if the run is made.

Many fine artists are engaging in these limited edition print runs for their works that have shown some popular demand and it has been a very normal part of doing fine art in a business-like way since about the 1980’s.

Remember, however, that fine art publishing houses that are legitimate – do not require the artists and illustrators to put up money for the limited edition run. The making a print as a limited edition independently of the fine art publishers, normally requires that the artist and possible a co-investor or partner, put up the money to print the edition, package and market it.

When an art publisher makes a deal with you to publish your work, they are negotiating for certain rights to profit from the work you created and to do so either with you – or to buy those rights in some measure for some period of time, from you. Suffice it to say, you should be getting money – not paying it out, because they are in the business of making their money from these images that were not created by them and do not belong to them.

One other note, aside from having your own website and possibly a blog about your art, there are portfolio platforms online that are amazing which will host your portfolio of artworks, so the public can see it and gallery owners can see it from there – long before you can get an appointment for the gallery to view your portfolio in person.

Gather as Much Information As Possible About Galleries for Your Artworks

However, that does bring up an important and last point – once you find a number of galleries that have work in the same neighborhood of focus as yours – then it is time to get online with their websites and get more information about them.

After that, it is time to do some phone calls, emails or response forms on their website to ask for them to see your portfolio. Some galleries have their requirements and process online – it used to be, send slides but now those can be sent as email attachments provided the photos of your work are as clear and color-true to the works as possible.

Every major city in the world have galleries as well as all the big US cities – but they are still selling to a demographic that is small and specific. Some galleries in certain US cities like Washington, D.C. may favor almost entirely 18th century work with only a few contemporary styles being acceptable within the market niche they are serving of political, law, lobbying and government offices.

Other places may want predominantly ocean paintings or nautical art, sailing yachts and big ships on stormy waves. And, remember that what was avant-garde a week ago, or a month ago, or a year ago now is far removed from what may be considered that way today and right this minute.

And, despite what anyone may tell you in the arts communities – most galleries don’t necessarily want the avant-garde anyway, unless that is specific to their business model and marketing plan – or if that is what their known customer base is hungry to see, to have and to own.

  • cricketdiane, 03-19-2018

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