Category Archives: creativity

What it is to Create and Invent

Re-post from the CricketDiane Weblog 2008

Standing At The Threshold About To Create –
By Cricket Diane C Phillips, 2008

When I stand on the threshold about to create – entire universes stretch out before me.

Behind me is everything I’ve ever created or wanted to create. Before me is everything that could be created. To either side is everything that exists which has been created by someone already both historically and currently.

Above me are all the things and ideas that have existed only as possibilities and have yet to be created. And, below the edge of the threshold is everything that exists now somewhere.

From the vantage point of this moment in time standing on the threshold about to create, any combination can be made from what is beyond it. Sometimes I choose a goal before entering this threshold because I intend to create something for a particular person or situation and want it to suit that.

To me, the threshold of about to create is like an open door frame standing in the midst of infinity. It is an infinity that moves out in all directions and is filled with possibilities, knowledge, skills, ideas and tangible things already created somewhere, sometime by God, nature or someone. It is all available for me to utilize or create or combine into something new, or rework, refine and modulate into my own creation.

I do usually start with a purpose but not always. And, where some may go timidly over that threshold, I love to stand on the threshold encompassing it all then fling myself into it. I take a leap of flight into that place and soar through its realms.

I love flying through the elements that are there, choosing from them, considering elements that catch my attention and weaving what is being created as I go. I don’t forcibly keep my goal in mind but it is there and I don’t exclude anything. It is all available regardless of my mind’s constraints of limitations and resources.

This means that whether I have the means to acquire something or not doesn’t matter – it is still available for me to use in the creative process. I don’t exclude things because of limitations currently in my life. Anything can be acquired if its really needed to accomplish creating something.

Some people strive within their limitations to accomplish and to create. They exclude what is beyond this threshold that cannot be accommodated by their current means to acquire it. Usually that is whole worlds of things and believe me, it is an unnecessary constraint. I ignore my limitations of known quantities that are currently in my life and offer everything to the creative process without limitation.

Truth is, I can probably get my hands on it if I need it to work with anyway. There is no project too big, too complex or too out of reach to consider. I don’t feel I have to make and original and unique creation of my own exclusively. Mostly I do, but it is not limited to that and it isn’t a requirement of the process.

What I do is to fly through these infinite worlds beyond the threshold and test, play, choose, combine, study, consider and add together like things and unlike things until I’ve created something that suits my purpose. So, the purpose that brought me to the threshold does define what is being created but it isn’t required to have that definition. It can be done without form or definition set ahead of time. I love doing this too when I have no purpose in mind and want to free-form create. What is done in this process may become a painting, an idea, a writing, a musical composition, an invention, a situation or a project but it does beome an end result that is tangible.

I can set parameters and conditions if I want like, “I want something that will do this,” or “I want some things that will suit this or this person.” The process will use that variable to compare and work with everything beyond the threshold as I create. When I happen upon something that doesn’t fit that parameter, if it has taken my notice – I grab it too and bring it with me. I don’t try to figure out how it fits or whether it belongs to some other project or need I have. Later, it usually becomes obvious without me setting my mind on figuring it out or sorting it out to where it belongs.

CricketDiane 01-17-17

Please visit my store on Zazzle sometime –

CricketDiane and Cricket House Studios Art and Design

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The Dance of Creating

Reposted from 2008 –

On Creating –
There is a dance that happens when I create. In this moment of dance spiritually all things are changed. It is a dance of fire and light and water and power that surges through me and what I am creating – back and forth – dancing together with all of creation in the heart of the universe.

There is nothing else except the song of creation being woven into this beautiful intense dance as it is happening. The dances of this song send ripples out through every living thing and into every spark of an atom in the world and beyond. It flows between time and space surpassing now.

The creativity of that moment in creation influences every moment in my life and every life touched by it that follows. It enlivens, it inspires, it awakens, it enthuses and infuses power into everything the song gently nudges with life.

How much more worthwhile could something be?

For me, it doesn’t matter what form the creating takes – the dance happens when I paint, make music, write, invent, sing, sew, cook or create anything. It is possible to create without giving in to that essence but what it creates isn’t nearly as good. Like comparing a light bulb to the sun.

– Cricket Diane
CricketHouseStudios, 2008

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Artist Tips and Tricks – repost

Tips and Tricks for Artists –
© Cricket Diane C. Phillips, 2008

Ten art tips and tricks for artists-

* place a sign on the bathroom mirror that says, “Paint first – Do music – Create. And leave the mundane to do later, it can wait.”

* the best palettes for oils and acrylics are glass, old pyrex casserole dishes, thick glass cutting boards – smooth side only, microwave browning plates for watercolors and thick plate glass can be used for oils or acrylics and gouache.

* a wonderful brush cleaner can be made by cutting a circle from rubberized open-weave shelf liner in the same size as the bottom of a washed applesauce cup, small bottle or container.

* using a wet paper towel folded over beneath acrylic paints will keep them ready to use for several weeks with plastic wrap covering the palette. Edges of wrap need to be snug.

* point guards for brushes, bamboos, calligraphy pens, styluses, djanti and specialty tools can be made with small pieces of cardboard or plastic boxes cut to fit from a fold and taped together.

* strong tea makes a sepia toned dye for paper and made strong enough, can serve as a watercolor paint to do under-painting work or as the basic wash and paint for a vintage look artwork.

* one way to organize thumbnails and small composition sketches is to cut them into the size for a 4×6 photo album. Also, it’s possible to use the inner papers from these albums for thumbnails and then store them in the albums by subject to locate later.

* most vegetable based and India inks are not waterproof. Many fixative sprays made for pastels, watercolors and pencil drawings will set the surface and allow the ink to become permanent.

* when fixative sprays, spray finishes and glazes, spray varnishes and any other aerosol product gets near the end of the can, any type of artwork can be destroyed by the spitting drops of spray. This can also happen during very cold or very moist, humid weather.

* horizon lines, building edges and other straight-edged elements can be created with pieces of painters’ tape for a smooth, straight line. Make sure the tape is pushed into the surface to paint at the edge where paint will be.

Check back. More tips and tricks for artists are coming soon including easel ideas and designs. Take a look at my Ebay store sometime, I’d love for you to see my work!

Why Bother To Paint, to Create, to Invent, to Innovate, to Sculpt, to Design, to Write?

(re-posted blog entry from 2008)

Once upon a time, there was a world that was filled with so many things of so many kinds that there was no longer a reason to create anything. The people of that world fought each other over the most petty things. They were forever trying to find escape from the doldrums of everyday living. They found little worthwhile to do even while they were running and running and doing and doing all the time.

Whenever confronted with a new idea, a new thing, or a new way of doing something, the people of this world flocked to it as though they were starved and dying of thirst for any touch of life that might come to them. The hunger and thirst were unsatisfied, though, and with each new thing they would flock again to have it.

No one realized in this world of such abundance, why their level of satisfaction and contentment seemed so elusive and fleeting. No one knew why the smallest things annoyed them nor why their resentment and discontent seemed to grow. It seems our world is that way now. In some ways, it seems there would be no reason to create even one more thing to add to this world. And yet . . .

When I create, the pettiness I can be inclined to let run my life, disappears. When I paint or write, I feel part of instead of isolated from the bigger world. Feeling a part of this bigger world gives me a sense of purpose and belonging. The discontentment and resentments seem to melt away in light of this sense of purpose.

As I strive to write with a bit of humor, my mind is forced to a level of honesty and candidness that I might otherwise try to hide. Getting to that honesty reminds me that the abundance in the world is not necessarily everything that is needed in the world nor all that could be. That is why I paint and am driven to create. . .

Because there is more to do yet.

Written by Cricket Diane C Phillips 2008

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What is the Difference Between Art and Illustration

The difference between art and illustration –
©2008 Cricket Diane C Phillips, Cricket House Studios

In an illustration, there is little, if anything, for the viewer to do. All the information is there available for the viewer to see. It can be powerful. It can be mundane. There can be several themes at once but it precisely includes all the visual information the audience is expected to use upon viewing it. An illustration is a visual approach to a verbal story. Illustration is easily given words to express it that are appropriate to it.

The fact is, art is something else and represents a more interactive form of visual communication. It does require something from the viewer in order to be recognized. Art is not intended as a verbal communication represented in a visual format. Then, what else could it be? What other options are there, if it is not that?

Most art, even representational art, defies the use of words to interpret it. While its communication is often clearly evident, words pale in comparison. Art speaks in a language that exceeds the capacity of words. It is a direct link between the mind of each viewer and an intangible idea in a specific moment of an artist’s life.

While an illustration could be repeated, recreated, reinterpreted or done again, art can only be done once. Each time, art is different and each time, there is only one. While art may tell a story, its use of communication is different than that used in an illustration. Art may very well tell the viewer the entire story in one moment of time as a whole experience. Illustration will construct that story logically such that words could be used to describe each element and why it was included.

Both art and illustration have value in our world. Art is necessary to our lives and so too, is illustration, written communication and design. If a quick view is taken anywhere, there is art, illustration, design and written communications on nearly every item in some form or another.

Art is interactive to a greater degree than other forms of visual work because it is created from a different place. It isn’t pure, yet neither is it diluted. Art is a captured instant from the artist’s psych. Does it matter if anyone likes it or not? Probably, not. Does it matter if anyone “gets it,” or not? Probably, not. Those things belong to a part of the viewer’s identity and the logical mind, respectively. Art by its nature, goes beyond what can be logically defined and is neither an expression of identity nor intended to be, although influenced by it. Nor is art a reflection of the personality of the artist, although that also influences it.

CricketDiane Art 2016
Ball in circle that looks like a mouth and tongue sticking out – graphic design created by CricketDiane 2016

Art encompasses more than that and different than that. It is impossible for any two people to see the same rainbow even standing side by side at the same moment in time. Art is like that and when it is created, even more so. Its as if the whole world has melted away and only that one moment exists. All the information of that moment flows into the artwork at once, not logically, not progressively, but completely. It is true of great art and true of all other art, as well. Two people sitting side by side creating from the same moment along the same theme would never be able to produce the same thing. That is art. It is original and unique each time. It can be copied, reproduced, printed, repainted to a precise rendition but they are no more than copies. To sit down and recreate the original from scratch, so to speak, will never yield the same thing, ever. No matter how similar, it can’t be made the same as the first. An artist that tries to do that usually ends up with two originals along a similar theme – not two of the same.

Why does it matter to own an original of anything? I don’t know that. Why is it important to own something there is only one of or is the first of its kind in the world? I don’t know that, either. Those are questions the audience or the individual viewer must answer for themselves. It may be important for art to be purchased and owned by someone beyond th artist who originated it, but probably not.

An illustration after all, demands an audience to be effective. Art draws the audience into an interaction effectively whether it is sitting in the studio or on public display or owned by someone somewhere. Once art has a tangible form, it is in existence and is part of all that has been created from that moment forward. Even when it is destroyed, its tangible form still exists in the mind of its creator and any who experienced it.

Artist's Shadow - illustrative and fine art photograph simultaneously both by CricketDiane 2016
Illustrative Art and Fine Art Photography by CricketDiane 2016 and Cricket House Studios Art and Design – in this photograph, this is my shadow broken by the lines of the pavement, curb and grass beyond it – CricketDiane 2017

Art is powerful because it forms its interaction with the viewer the moment it is seen. The communication it carries is conveyed in its entirety across all barriers of language, time, circumstance and culture. Its effects are not limited by the status of the viewer nor where it is found and experienced by viewers. A diamond in a shoebox is still a diamond.

  • cricketdiane 2008 (02-20-2008)

Original post titled –

The Difference Between Illustration and Art – Cricket Diane C Phillips – Cricket House Studios – 2008

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Mixing Artist Paints into Designer Colors How To

[Reposted from CricketDiane blog 2008]

On Paints and Color – Tips for Artists –  2008

Written by Cricket Diane C Phillips, Cricket House Studios, 2008

Artist paints in the tube are not the current fashion colors. While some very rich, jewel tones can be achieved by using artist colors straight out of the tube, today’s color trend hues are mixed, either on the palette or on the painting as it is painted.

In order to get these tones of color, use a color chart from any paint or discount store used for wall and house paints, *(interior and exterior paint color swatches.) Using these as a guideline, mix to match.

Series colors are simple additions of white or grey within the same range. Almost all fashion colors are mixtures and blends of artist’s hues in combination. Compare to swatches and if necessary, write down the ingredients and ratios used to create them on palette cards. Be sure to dot color on palette cards and remember – fully dry is a slightly different variation of the wet color. In use, it may have to be changed to read correctly.

Complementary colors and secondary color groups can be created in either the same range of hue and tone, or for visual tension and contrast, can be dissonant to one another; for example, bright red and soft, pastel turquoise. These dissonant combinations will either brighten or grey each color when used together or near one another. They can bring objects closer to the viewer, make things appear to stand out in the composition or appear distant and muddied.

True complements used in strength, flatten the picture plane which when juxtaposed with elements of technical perspective to create illusions of depth and volume in a flat surface. Look at the work of Chagall and Gaugin for comparison.

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I’m adding this today to go with mixing designer colors from artist paint tube color –

Many home improvement stores including Lowe’s, Home Depot, Ace Hardware and paint stores for home decor and home exterior paints have small quantities of mixed designer colors in acrylic liquid paint.

These are suitable either for making art paintings directly with them or to use in mixing artist tube paints into their matching and complementary color palettes for artworks using artist’s paints.

Usually these small quantities of designer colors are found in the paint departments, are acrylic paint basically and the quantities are about $3 – $4 each. It is possible to design a range of colors to match cohesively and attractively with them by having these small jars to use for creating the matching palette.

There are of course, paint swatches also available but they can be misleading by themselves, since the range an artwork must provide needs to have a minimum of, a full palette in the dominant and secondary hue ranges to accomplish the artist’s visual tasks.

Magazine pictures and photographs of where the artwork will eventually be displayed are also misleading and it must be kept in mind that lighting alters the tones and character of paints, both in designer colors and artistic colors no matter how they are mixed.

Photography of a room’s decor can seem to be one set of hues, when in real life under natural and on site lighting, as well as the position where the artwork will be displayed, will host a much distant reality for the work.

Designer colors change and what looks right online is far different than what any of the colors would actually be, as well. Taking these things into account in the studio as the palette of colors are created, it is possible to either ignore all of it and simply create.

Or, to create using a palette that can most reasonably accommodate these difference in lighting, staging, photography, online presentations of the work both individually and in the rooms where it will be displayed as well as in matching the designer color palette used within the environment where the artwork and artist’s reputation will live.

Also, a last note – keep in mind that often in magazine publication practices and in many advertising applications, online applications and printed artworks, the color range is altered using the color levels function of various software apps. The end ranges are removed to the point on the levels charts where color graphs indicate positions of strongest color to enhance the visual impact of the photograph, ad or artwork.

Since that changes the color true visual facts, do not assume that an artwork’s color palette and paints as seen in person will match a designer or decorator themed room as seen in photographs from a magazine or online feature article.

Even if a tablecloth seems to be a certain range of color, chances are that the levels function was used to visually enhance the colors for publication and in person, artwork made to work cohesively with it will appear washed out or occasionally, completely at odds with the design colors.

For more tips and tools about making art, painting, design, creativity and making – check back with my blog. I will be adding more information from my older blog at CricketDiane as well as creating new articles and blog posts for this one.

  • cricketdiane 12-29-2016

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Christmas Day

Twas the day of Christmas 2016

Not a present in sight cause things were so lean.

The merriment cast shadows from distances afar

While here there was nothing even close to the par.

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I’d say it was Christmas, but it is hard to tell

Cause visions of hope have all gone to hell.

It isn’t that things are worse than they seem

They really are bad with nothing between.

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Being poor in America is a horrible delight

When seeing only shitheads win with spite.

The chances of working to do something better

Are gone whether working or being a go-getter.

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America is a place that once offered equality

And hopes of financial and economic prosperity.

Now it’s a wasteland for all but a few

Who think there is nothing that they need to do.

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So here is it Christmas and gratefully ignored

The presents, the Santa, the candy galore.

While Americans think it is the start of a new day

The country lies barren with no places to play.

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And economic prosperity is no more than a dream

Where despair is the only dish that is seen.

There is no more hope, no reason to stay,

American lives are given no value today.

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Only corporations matter to the powers that be

Though businesses are not real partners in society.

Communities stand broken, beyond all repair,

While investors sell houses to those who don’t care.

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There once was a place where America stood

For equality and opportunity for any that could.

That place is far gone and removed from today

By many years’ distance and no longer the way.

 

  • by cricketdiane, 12-25-2016

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